Top 10 Most popular pedigree dog breeds of 2019

Top 10 Most popular pedigree dog breeds of 2019

Last week the Kennel Club announced the top 10 dog breeds in the UK in 2019. The list is complied using the number of pedigree dogs that have been registered with the KC in the UK during the past year. This means only purebred, registered breeds have made the list so it doesn’t include any crossbreeds like Cockapoos or Labradoodles - or unregistered dogs (even if they are purebred).

1. Labrador

Topping the list year is the Labrador, This breed has bounced back into pole position after being knocked into second place last year by the uber-fashionable French Bulldog and it is easy to see why. Labradors are good all-rounders, popular both as pets and working dogs and are generally good-natured and easy to train. 

Labrador pic by Samuel Thompson on Unsplash
Labrador pic by Samuel Thompson on Unsplash

2. French Bulldog

Just pipped to the top spot this year these popular little dogs are fun loving and mischievous and make great companions as they are very adaptable and eager to please without being excessively demanding.

French Bulldog pic by David Becker on Unsplash
French Bulldog pic by David Becker on Unsplash

3. Cocker Spaniel 

A lively-medium sized dog, these pups are playful yet even-tempered and tend to be very good around children and other animals. They may be growing in popularity due to them being one half of the ‘Cockapoo’ crossbreed combination (a Cocker Spaniel crossed with a Poodle) which is one of the most popular types of crossbreed dog in the UK right now.

Cocker Spaniel pic by Sava Zeravica on Unsplash
Cocker Spaniel pic by Sava Zeravica on Unsplash

4. Bulldog

Bulldogs are dependable and predictable and also very people-oriented. Originally bred to drive cattle, they now prefer a cuddle and a kip on a sofa to any kind of strenuous exercise and have become just as popular for their personality as their characterful looks.

Bulldog pic by Rodolfo Sanches Carvalho on Unsplash
Bulldog pic by Rodolfo Sanches Carvalho on Unsplash

5. Springer Spaniel 

Springer Spaniels were originally bred as gun dogs and are still used as working dogs up and down the country as well as being popular pets. Spaniels enjoy plenty of exercise and are a common choice for dog agility and CaniCross (running with your dog).

Springer Spaniels pic by Tim Riesner on Unsplash
Springer Spaniels pic by Tim Riesner on Unsplash

6. Golden Retriever

Like Labradors, retrievers make great pets and are very popular with families. They are intelligent and easy to train and are very affectionate and friendly, both at home and out and about with strangers and other dogs.

Golden Retriever pic by Orlando Tapia on Unsplash
Golden Retriever pic by Orlando Tapia on Unsplash

7. Miniature Dachshund

Originally bred to fight badgers (‘dachs’ is German for badger) these little dogs are full of personality. Miniature dachshunds – as the name suggests – are a smaller size version of the standard, medium-sized dog which – like llamas and sloths - have become prominent in popular culture over the past few years with dachshund print bedding, clothes and stationery appearing everywhere, possibly contributing to their rise in popularity.

Miniature Dachshund pic by Erda Estremera on Unsplash
Miniature Dachshund pic by Erda Estremera on Unsplash

8. Pug

Once considered to be a bit of an old ladies dog – pugs have worked their way into the nation’s hearts with their expressive, exuberant attitude. They make great family pets and are playful and affectionate with children - bonding easily with their owners. Like Dachshunds, Pugs have become prevalent in popular culture, with pug-print items for sale all over the high street. There are also a few prominent pugs on TV – notably Horace from Poldark and Mighty Mike the children’s TV character – who might also be influencing the rise in popularity.

Pug pic by Ryan Antooa on Unsplash
Pug pic by Ryan Antooa on Unsplash

9. German Shepherd

A good all rounder, German Shepherds are very popular both with families and as working dogs. Originally bred for herding. German Shepherds are best known for their loyalty, courage and guarding instincts which make them ideal for use with the police, military security industry, as guide dogs or with search and rescue teams.

German Shepherd pic by Katelyn MacMillan on Unsplash
German Shepherd pic by Katelyn MacMillan on Unsplash

10. Miniature Schnauzer 

These little dogs are incredibly expressive and love to be the centre of attention. Although they are small in stature, they are definitely not lap dogs. They like to run around, chase things and dig holes and they are very alert – making them great guard dogs.

Miniature Schnauzer pic by Chris Child on Unsplash
Miniature Schnauzer pic by Chris Child on Unsplash

Moving down the List

Just outside the top ten this year the West Highland Terrier, Boxer, Staffie and Border Terrier, are proving less popular than in previous years.

Dogs in Danger

Whilst enabling us to see which are the most popular breeds this year –the list also shows us which dog breeds are in danger of becoming extinct. Like the Old English Sheepdog breed discussed on last week’s blog, another one of Britain’s oldest dog breeds - the Pointer - is now on the Kennel Clubs ‘At Watch List’ with only 436 registrations in 2019.

Pointer pic by Bruce Williamson on Unsplash
Pointer pic by Bruce Williamson on Unsplash

Speaking to Metro, Bill Lambert, spokesperson for the Kennel Club, discussed concerns about the decline of these breeds:

“People simply forget there are so many different dog breeds, with different personalities and characteristics, and it’s not just the popular, well-known ones that make a great match for our varying lifestyles.

“These latest figures show that whilst some historic native breeds like the corgi are having a revival, others continue to fall rapidly in popularity and are genuinely at risk of disappearing. While we’re lucky to have such diversity amongst our canine companions, it is worrying that old favourites like the pointer and Parson Russell terrier are dropping in numbers to historical lows. 

“We urge people to make sure they understand the breed and its characteristics before they make a decision to buy or rescue a dog, and to spend time researching the wide variety of breeds we are lucky to have in this country, to make sure they get the right one for them. ‘The newly popular Chow Chow for example, due to its delightful profuse woolly coat, needs a lot of grooming, while the Shiba Inu – which translates to ‘small dog’ – has a big personality and is full of energy.” 

Did your dog make the list this year? What dog breed would you like to see in the top spot? Let us know in the comments section below.

(Main pic: Happy Labrador by Emerson Peters on Unsplash)


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